Shipping: GBP £4.50 Worldwide shipping fee.

Typically Dutch - Canal Houses - Mint - Sheetlets

Sheetlets
GBP £5.24
Official Price Guaranteed
(item in basket)
Other products in issue
Sheetlets
GBP £5.24
Sheetlets CTO
GBP £5.24
First Day Cover
GBP £3.29
Presentation Pack
GBP £4.45
Technical details
  • 22.03.2021
  • Edwin van Praet
  • Cartor Security Printing, Meaucé-La Loupe, France
  • Offset
  • Cyan, Magenta, Yellow And Black
  • 40 x 30mm
About Typically Dutch - Canal Houses - Mint

This year, the Typically Dutch series focuses on house types and façades that are typical for the Netherlands. The 22 March issue features canal houses in Amsterdam. Amsterdam's grachtengordel or canal district was built in phases, which began by digging Prinsengracht, Keizersgracht and Herengracht in the early 17th century. From around 1660, the city extended the canals to the Amstel. Finally, around 1680, the Oostelijke Eilanden district was developed. This gave the map of Amsterdam its characteristic crescent shape. During the construction, there were lots of regulations promoting the construction of beautiful houses for the wealthy. The government provided solid quays and built elegant stone arched bridges to protect the city. The traditional 17th century canal house was not very wide. The rooms were arranged one behind the other. The front part of the house was on the canal and next to it was a side room. Then came the inner room, which looked out onto a courtyard at the back. The corridor along the inner room led to the back room (called the ‘sael’) with a view of the garden. In the second half of the 18th century, many canal houses were raised and provided with contemporary façades. At the end of the 19th century, front doors were often moved from the piano nobile to the ground floor. Most canal houses have been renovated several times over time, resulting in the coexistence of many different architectural styles, façade types and window panes. In 2010, Amsterdam's canal district was declared a UNESCO world heritage site.

[read more]